REPAIRS

There are many representations of one's birth month but none is more beautiful than a birthstone. Whether you are a gem fan or simply curious, see below birthstones by month, according to Geological Institute of America.

JANUARY

GARNET

The garnet is so durable, remnants of garnet jewelry have been found dating as far back as the Bronze Age. Other references go back to 3100 BC when the Egyptians used garnet as inlays in their jewelry and carvings.

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February

Amethyst

Amethyst is purple quartz and is a beautiful blend of violet and red that can be found in every corner of the world. The name comes from the Ancient Greek, derived from the word methustos, which means “intoxicated.”

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March

Aquamarine

The serenely colored aquamarine invokes the tranquility of its namesake, the sea. In fact, the name aquamarine is derived from the Latin word aqua, meaning water, and marina, meaning the sea.

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April

Diamond

You probably already know of the diamond’s toughness. In fact, it’s the hardest gemstone and is made of just one element: carbon. Diamonds have been admired for centuries. Some historians estimate they were traded as early as 4 BC.

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May

Emerald

As the birthstone for May, the emerald, a symbol of rebirth, is believed to grant the owner foresight, good fortune, and youth. Emerald, derived from the word “smaragdus,” means, quite literally, “green” in Greek.

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June

Pearl or Moonstone

Pearls are the only gemstones made by living creatures. Mollusks produce pearls by depositing layers of calcium carbonate around microscopic irritants that get lodged in their shells, usually not a grain of sand, as commonly believed.

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July

Ruby

Symbolic of passion, protection, and prosperity, ruby gemstones have been revered since ancient times. Rubies have been particularly prized in Asian countries. Records suggest that rubies were traded along China’s North Silk Road as early as 200 BC.

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August

Peridot

Ancient Egyptians called peridot the “gem of the sun,” believing it protected its wearer from terrors of the night. Some historians believe that Cleopatra’s famed emerald collection may have actually been peridot.

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September

Sapphire

Greeks wore sapphire for guidance when seeking answers from the oracle. Buddhists believed that it brought spiritual enlightenment, and Hindus used it during worship. Early Christian kings cherished sapphire’s powers of protection by using it in ecclesiastical rings.

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October

Opal or Tourmaline

The name “opal” originates from the Greek word opallios, which meant “to see a change in color.” The Roman scholar Pliny used the word opalus when he wrote about this gemstone’s kaleidoscopic “play” of rainbow colors that could simulate shades of any stone.

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November

Topaz or Citrine

During the Renaissance in Europe, people believed that topaz could break spells and quell anger. Hindus deemed topaz sacred, believing that a pendant could bring wisdom and longevity to one’s life.

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December

Tanzanite, turquoise or zircon

Since ancient times, cultures around the world have admired the distinct color of turquoise.The earliest evidence of turquoise gemstones comes from ancient Egyptian tombs, which contain elaborate turquoise jewelry dating back to 3000 BCE.

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